Planning & Research

Managing riparian vegetation is only one component of effective riparian restoration. Thus, we strive to look at restoration practices as a whole and encourage our partners to do the same. To do this, we participate in large-scale efforts that aim to increase capacity for planning and availability of research that will help to advance riparian restoration. The following are some examples of activities we are currently involved in:

Planning

Tamarisk and Russian Olive Assessments:
 
Tamarisk and Russian olive removal is one component of the complex issues surrounding riparian restoration and watershed health. Through our own work and that of our partners, we strive to connect to the latest research and information that will support successful riparian restoration.  Some of the key documents that support this work include:
 

Research

Tamarisk Coalition leads research to inform riparian restoration efforts in a variety of ways, including:
 
Coordinating watershed-wide and small-scale pilot project studies within multiple watersheds. Sample projects/reports include:
Working with a host of academic researchers throughout the West individually and through riparian restoration partnerships.  A recent example includes the:
  • Tamarisk beetle (Diorhabda spp.) in the Colorado River basin: synthesis of an expert panel forum.  This report was released by the Tamarisk Coalition and the Ruth Powell Hutchins Water Center at Colorado Mesa University.  The report presents information on the probable ecological impact of the tamarisk beetle’s spread and identifies key factors to consider when selecting riparian restoration actions where the beetle is likely to become established.
  • Dolores River Cottonwood Suitability Assessment (2014).  This report provides recommendations on how to increase the survival/success rate of cottonwood and willow plantings based on a study conducted along the Dolores River.  The study also provides guidelines to help develop a streamlined protocol that others can use to enhance the success of cottonwood plantings on other rivers across the West.
Working with Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCC's) who work to bridge the gap between the needs of land managers and academic research by providing funding for conducting applied research with direct benefits to on-the-ground restoration efforts

 

Tamarisk Coalition's

mission is to advance the restoration of riparian lands through collaboration, education, and technical assistance.

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